Hunters can support less fortunate- J. Martino




Hunters can support less fortunate By: John Martino Indiana hunters know firsthand the pride and satisfaction of bringing home a nutritious meal of wild game to the family supper table. Imagine trying to feed your family without the available means. That struggle – with its stress, disappointment and anxiety – becomes particularly tough on some families during the holiday season each year, with increased demands on a household budget. Small acts of kindness can go a long way in life. It’s a sad commentary in today’s society there are still those who may not know where their next meal will come from. These people don’t reside solely in big cities, instead places like Carroll, Cass and Howard Counties. Everyone knows that hunters are a benevolent group and now there is a way where we can help. How? By providing delicious and healthy venison to families who would appreciate it the most. Those who donate spread goodwill far and wide. Ken Worman heads up Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry in Carroll, Cass and Howard Counties. “Actually the group has been around for 20 years but 10 years in Indiana,” he said, who with his wife Jane, see to it that hundreds of people benefit from a delicious meal. For interested hunters it’s simple. If you’d like to donate your deer to help feed the needy, all you have to do is take it to Frank Simpson’s Deer Processing in Young America. For the hunter it’s free. FHFH pays all the processing fees. “We could not do it without help from our corporate sponsors, local businesses and private contributions,” says Worman. Some of the program’s corporate sponsors include industry giants like Mossy Oak, Henry Rifles, Redneck Blinds and Mathews. Sponsors provide the funding, the Worman’s provide all the local legwork and hunters provide the deer. “I have more time than money,” said Ken. “So it’s the best thing I can donate to the less fortunate.” The couple does not receive any type of monetary compensation for their efforts. “The satisfaction Jane and I get knowing we have done something to help the needy is more compensation than we could ask for,” he added. Some of Ken’s responsibilities include organizing a growing network of volunteers to donate venison and those who process, package and store the meat and the group who distributes it. He is also the one who promotes the program so others can learn of the beneficial organization. His wife Jane takes care of all the advertising on social media, print and other marketing avenues. Another interesting option the organization provides is a hunter can specify which county he prefers his venison to be donated. “If they want it to go to Cass, Carroll or Howard County just let them know at Simpson’s when you take your deer in,” says Ken. Last year nearly 2,000 pounds of venison was donated and he hopes for an increase this year. “We get a lot when the bonus county season kicks in,” he added. This is a season where extra does are allowed to be taken by properly licenses hunters. There is another reason why donating venison is beneficial. Society is made up of three groups’ of people - hunters, non-hunters and anti-hunters. The non-hunters are by far the largest. Donating venison helps them view our traditional activity in a positive light. If we do a good job as ethical and respectable sportsmen we will move more people to support the hunting community. Hunters interested in donating can take their deer to Frank Simpson’s Deer Processing, 1436 Denmark St., Young America. If you want to learn more about FHFH you can contact Worman at (574) 601-9595. You can also email him at wormanauctions@gmail.com or by visiting fhfh.org. Hunters can support less fortunate By: John Martino Indiana hunters know firsthand the pride and satisfaction of bringing home a nutritious meal of wild game to the family supper table. Imagine trying to feed your family without the available means. That struggle – with its stress, disappointment and anxiety – becomes particularly tough on some families during the holiday season each year, with increased demands on a household budget. Small acts of kindness can go a long way in life. It’s a sad commentary in today’s society there are still those who may not know where their next meal will come from. These people don’t reside solely in big cities, instead places like Carroll, Cass and Howard Counties. Everyone knows that hunters are a benevolent group and now there is a way where we can help. How? By providing delicious and healthy venison to families who would appreciate it the most. Those who donate spread goodwill far and wide. Ken Worman heads up Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry in Carroll, Cass and Howard Counties. “Actually the group has been around for 20 years but 10 years in Indiana,” he said, who with his wife Jane, see to it that hundreds of people benefit from a delicious meal. For interested hunters it’s simple. If you’d like to donate your deer to help feed the needy, all you have to do is take it to Frank Simpson’s Deer Processing in Young America. For the hunter it’s free. FHFH pays all the processing fees. “We could not do it without help from our corporate sponsors, local businesses and private contributions,” says Worman. Some of the program’s corporate sponsors include industry giants like Mossy Oak, Henry Rifles, Redneck Blinds and Mathews. Sponsors provide the funding, the Worman’s provide all the local legwork and hunters provide the deer. “I have more time than money,” said Ken. “So it’s the best thing I can donate to the less fortunate.” The couple does not receive any type of monetary compensation for their efforts. “The satisfaction Jane and I get knowing we have done something to help the needy is more compensation than we could ask for,” he added. Some of Ken’s responsibilities include organizing a growing network of volunteers to donate venison and those who process, package and store the meat and the group who distributes it. He is also the one who promotes the program so others can learn of the beneficial organization. His wife Jane takes care of all the advertising on social media, print and other marketing avenues. Another interesting option the organization provides is a hunter can specify which county he prefers his venison to be donated. “If they want it to go to Cass, Carroll or Howard County just let them know at Simpson’s when you take your deer in,” says Ken. Last year nearly 2,000 pounds of venison was donated and he hopes for an increase this year. “We get a lot when the bonus county season kicks in,” he added. This is a season where extra does are allowed to be taken by properly licenses hunters. There is another reason why donating venison is beneficial. Society is made up of three groups’ of people - hunters, non-hunters and anti-hunters. The non-hunters are by far the largest. Donating venison helps them view our traditional activity in a positive light. If we do a good job as ethical and respectable sportsmen we will move more people to support the hunting community. Hunters interested in donating can take their deer to Frank Simpson’s Deer Processing, 1436 Denmark St., Young America. Photo below;"Jane and Ken Worman organize a 3-county region of FHFH providing hunter produced venison to the less fortunate."